globe
  1. 1. Introduction and 2. Thinking about space and society 7 items
    With some example. this lecture outlines the key ideas underpinning 'spatial' approach to understanding society.
    1. Essential reading 4 items
      1. Space as a Keyword - D. Harvey

        Chapter Essential This reading is also in the book below.

      2. Power-geometry and a progressive sense of place - D, Massey

        Chapter Essential E-book. This chapter can be downloaded from the contents section.

      3. Some new instructions for travellers: the geography of Bruno Latour and Michel Serres - N Bingham, N Thrift

        Chapter Essential E-book. This chapter can be downloaded from the contents section.

    2. Recommended reading 3 items
      1. Introduction - M Craig, N Thrift

        Chapter Recommended E-book. This chapter can be downloaded from the contents section.

      2. For space - Doreen B. Massey 2005

        Book Recommended More philosophically nuanced defence of this approach.

      3. The dictionary of human geography - Derek Gregory 2009

        Book Recommended E-book. See the entry for 'space'.

  2. Block 1: Territory, containment, exclusion 41 items
    1. Section 1: Geographies of migration: mobilities, exclusion, containment 20 items
      1. 3. Migration and borders 8 items
        This lecture considers the relationship between international migration and hard, state borders. It introduces the concept of 'bordering' and how the creation and maintenance of borders is essential to the continuation of the nation-state system, globally. It touches on issues of citizenship, diaspora and territory.
        1. Essential reading 3 items
          1. Diaspora as Process: (De)Constructing Boundaries - Elizabeth Mavroudi 05/2007

            Article Essential E-journal

        2. Recommended reading 5 items
          1. Migration Borders Freedom - Harald Bauder 2016

            Book Recommended E-book

          2. The Invention of the Passport - John C. Torpey 26/07/2018

            Book Recommended E-book

          3. Migration - Michael Samers 2009-12-7

            Book Recommended E-book

      2. 4. Migration and mobilities 6 items
        This lecture discusses the significant of migration as a form of mobility. It introduces the ‘mobilities turn’ in the social sciences and discuses the implications of this for understanding the interrelations between space and society.
        1. Essential reading 2 items
          1. The New Mobilities Paradigm - Mimi Sheller, John Urry 02/2006

            Article Essential E-journal

        2. Recommended reading 4 items
          1. Mobility - Peter Adey 2017-5-23

            Book Recommended E-book

          2. Mobilities I: Catching up - Tim Cresswell 08/2011

            Article Recommended E-journal

          3. Towards a Politics of Mobility - Tim Cresswell 02/2010

            Article Recommended E-journal

      3. 5. Migration, containment and exclusion 6 items
        This lecture applies notions of territorial space to understandings of the ways in which different nation states deploy spatial strategies in their attempts to 'manage', 'contain' and 'control' (im)migration.
        1. Essential reading 3 items
          1. Conceptualizing detention - Alison Mountz, Kate Coddington, R. Tina Catania, Jenna M. Loyd 08/2013

            Article Essential E-journal

          2. Schengen's Soft Underbelly? Irregular Migration and Human Smuggling across Land and Sea Borders to Italy - Ferruccio Pastore, Paola Monzini, Giuseppe Sciortino 10/2006

            Article Essential E-journal

        2. Recommended reading 3 items
          1. Families caring across borders: migration, ageing and transnational caregiving - Loretta Baldassar, Cora V. Baldock, Raelene Wilding 2007

            Book Recommended

          2. In/visibility and the Securitization of Migration - Alison Mountz 07/2015

            Article Recommended E-journal

    2. Section 2: Territory, Citizenship and the State 21 items
      1. 6. Territory and Territoriality 3 items
        This lecture introduced the geographic concepts of territory and territoriality with an understanding of space relations and politics. It introduces the underlying spatial practices of movement and the embedding of people and their activities in particular places that give rise to these concepts and moves on to the emergence of scalar and nested conceptions of space that abound in common understandings of the world.
        1. Essential reading 3 items
          1. The dictionary of human geography - Derek Gregory 2009

            Book Essential E-book. See entries on territory, territoriality and scale.

          2. Political Geography 01/01/2002

            Book Essential E-book. Please read the introduction.

          3. The social construction of scale - Sallie A. Marston 06/2000

            Article Essential E-journal

      2. 7. State and territorial sovereignty 6 items
        This lecture introduced the concept of the state and its importance as the main expression of territoriality. It also addresses the formation and understandings of territorial sovereignty at various historical junctures leading to the modern ‘imaginary communities’ and the growth of the nation-state. It then goes on to challenge ‘the territorial trap’ plaguing many conceptions of state as a static container of society and culture in order to open up the discussion of other territorial formations.
        1. Essential reading 2 items
        2. Further reading 4 items
          1. Imagined communities: reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism - Anderson, Benedict R. O'G. (Benedict Richard O'Gorman), 1936- c2006.

            Book Recommended Please read the introduction.

          2. When Territory Deborders Territoriality - Saskia Sassen 05/2013

            Article Recommended E-journal

          3. Theorizing the state geographically: Sovereignity, Subjectivity, Territoriality, - M Kuus, J Agnew

            Chapter Recommended E-book. This chapter can be found under part 6.

          4. Land, terrain, territory - Stuart Elden 12/2010

            Article Recommended E-journal

      3. 8. Citizenship and (community) belonging 7 items
        This lecture offers various definitions of citizenship, its historical evolution and various forms. It then looks at the ties of belonging that create forms of membership and sense of community in relation to—and sometimes in conflict with—national citizenships. It wraps up the discussion with introducing a politics of belonging that can combine territorial and non-territorial (e.g. networked/relational) forms of belonging.
        1. Essential reading 4 items
          1. Political geography: Where’s citizenship? - Lynn A. Staeheli 06/2011

            Article Essential E-journal

          2. Citizenship and Social Class - T.H. Marshall

            Chapter Essential E-book. Please read pp.8-43.

          3. The politics of belonging - Suzanne M. Hall 02/2013

            Article Essential E-journal

          4. Belonging and the politics of belonging - Nira Yuval-Davis 07/2006

            Article Essential E-journal

        2. Further reading 3 items
          1. Flexible citizenship: the cultural logics of transnationality - Aihwa Ong 1999

            Book Recommended Please read the introduction.

          2. Citizenship and migration: globalization and the politics of belonging - Stephen Castles, Alastair Davidson 2000

            Book Recommended

      4. 9. Diaspora and Identity politics 5 items
        This lecture introduces the diasporic forms of (community) belonging and unbelonging. The diasporas fall in between the territorial forms of state sovereignty and citizenship and therefore open up new opportunities and threats for social and political exclusion of groups and individuals. Identity politics is one of the common ways that diasporas join forces to negotiate these opportunities and threats, but this form of mobilisation has its own opportunities and threats.
        1. Essential reading 3 items
          1. Four phases of diaspora study - Robin Cohen

            Chapter Essential

          2. The Geopolitics of Diaspora - Sean Carter 2005

            Article Essential E-journal

          3. Different diasporas and the hype of hybridity - Katharyne Mitchell 1997

            Article Essential E-journal

        2. Further reading 2 items
          1. Mobilizing diasporas in a global age - Robin Cohen

            Chapter Recommended

    3. 10. Round up of block 1 lectures 0 items
  3. Block 2: Relational space and global networks 75 items
    1. Section 3: Historical geographies of globalisation 22 items
      These lectures are designed to provide you with a longer history and geography of globalisation than the one you are used to hearing about – one that stretches from the sixteenth to today. We will also explore ideas of relational space, tracing some of the complex connections between places that have shaped their historic and contemporary character. The focus will be on the Atlantic trade – in enslaved lives and the commodities they produced – which did so much to shape the nature of Africa, the Americas, and Europe through the emergence of both capitalism and empire. We will explore different ways of understanding the relationships between these spaces, and look more closely at the commodities and people who drew them together. In doing so we will move from site to site, from Jamaica to Britain, from imperial cities to rural Somerset. We will also consider some of the legacies of slavery, many of them forgotten or hotly debated today.
      1. 11. Historical Geographies of Globalisation 5 items
        This lecture introduces this section of the module, outlining both the broader context of the Atlantic trade and theories of relational space from systems to networks. Moving from ideas of a triangular trade we will look at the ways in which specific places became drawn into more or less structured connections with other sites. We will also begin to think about social and spatial distance and the hiding or forgetting of these geographies.
        1. Essential reading 2 items
          1. Local-global - Philip Crang

            Chapter Essential UCL username and password required for off-site access.

        2. Recommended reading 2 items
          1. Historical geographies of imperialism - A. Lester

            Chapter Recommended

          2. Imperialism and Empire - John Morrissey

            Chapter Recommended

        3. Optional reading 1 item
      2. 12. Sugar Islands, Sugar Boycotts 5 items
        This lecture focuses on a number of key sites in the networks of the Atlantic slave trade, places joined together by one of the most important modern commodities: sugar. From its production by enslaved workers in ‘sugar islands’ like Jamaica we will follow sugar to the American colonies and then across to Britain, where it was part of a wider ‘psychoactive revolution’ in the consumption habits of elite and ordinary people, alongside tobacco, chocolate and other substances. Abolitionists identified the close links between sugar and slavery and called for boycotts – an early example of ethical consumption and of geographies of responsibility.
        1. Essential reading 2 items
          1. Production - Sidney Wilfred Mintz

            Chapter Essential Digitised reading.

        2. Recommended reading 1 item
          1. Slave sugar boycotts, female activism and the domestic base of British anti‐slavery culture - Clare Midgley 12/1996

            Article Recommended UCL username and password required for off-site access.

        3. Optional reading 2 items
          1. The Big Three: Alcohol, Tobacco and Caffeine - David T. Courtwright

            Chapter Optional Digitised reading

      3. 13. Imperial Cities 8 items
        Shifting our attention from the places connected by imperial commodities, we now turn to those imperial cities that became ‘contact zones’ just like Jamaica, though not in such an obvious way. Cities like London and Glasgow were shaped by sugar and other commodities produced by the enslaved, though the trails connecting these commodities to the plantations were often hard to see. After abolition, imperial cities were also shaped by the compensation paid to slave owners, and they continued to display an imperial character until the end of the empire. Again, we will consider how and why these relations with former colonies have been forgotten.
        1. Essential reading 2 items
          1. Imperialism at Home - Patrick Brantlinger

            Chapter Essential UCL username and password required for off-site access.

        2. Recommended readings 3 items
          1. The Legacies of 2007: Remapping the Black Presence in Britain - Caroline Bressey 05/2009

            Article Recommended UCL username and password required for off-site access.

          2. Heart of empire? Landscape, space and performance in imperial London - Felix Driver, David Gilbert 1998

            Article Recommended UCL username and password required for off-campus access.

          3. London in 1900 - Jonathan Schneer

            Chapter Recommended Digitised reading

        3. Optional reading 3 items
      4. 14. Imperial Lives 4 items
        Finally, we change focus again to look at the ways in which individuals and groups were entangled in the networks of the Atlantic trade and empire – or made their own. These men and women – displaced Africans, citizens of the ‘Black Atlantic’, abolitionists and activists, former slave-owners – all operated at a very different scale to the world-spanning systems we began with. However, it is worth remembering that they were actively working within these networks, not simply the passive puppets of global forces.
        1. Required reading 1 item
          1. Reporting oppression: mapping racial prejudice in Anti-Caste and Fraternity, 1888–1895 - Caroline Bressey 10/2012

            Article Essential UCL username and password required for off-site access.

        2. Other recommended reading 1 item
          1. Geographies of Colonial Philanthropy - David Lambert June 2004

            Article Recommended UCL username and password required for off-site access.

        3. Optional reading 2 items
          1. Empire, race and the politics of anti-caste - Caroline Bressey 2013

            Book Optional UCL username and password required for off-site access.

          2. Legacies of British Slave-ownership - Catherine Hall, Nicholas Draper, Keith McClelland, Katie Donington 2014

            Book Optional UCL username and password required for off-site access.

    2. Section 4: Spaces of Global Responsibility 48 items
      This section of the module will explore the geographies associated with questions of responsibility for distant people and events, through contemporary examples of consumption choices in relation to Fair Trade, humanitarian generosity in the face of disasters, and changing forms of development co-operation. We will question whether responsibility flows from global connections and ask whether an ethics of responsibility is possible under conditions of capitalist globalisation. We will consider the politics associated with institutional responses to humanitarian concern and a desire to take responsibility, noting the role of different actors (individuals, NGOs, cities, states) and emerging geographies of south-south co-operation. We will focus on ideas about space as connections, as well as more "topological" spaces of presence and influence.
      1. Core text 1 item
      2. Background reading 10 items
        1. Society–space - Jo Little

          Chapter Recommended

        2. Commodities - Michael, Watts

          Chapter Recommended

        3. The Centre of Gravity Shifts: Transforming the Geographies of the Global Economy - Peter, Dicken

          Chapter Recommended

        4. Tangled Webs: Unravelling Complexity in the Global Economy - Peter, Dicken

          Chapter 

        5. We are What We Eat: The Agro-food Industries - Peter, Dicken

          Chapter 

        6. Fabric-ating Fashion: The Clothing Industries - Peter, Dicken

          Chapter Recommended There are numerous editions of this book, if you read an earlier version, please select the relevant chapters. The contents of the 7th edition are here: www.guilford.com/books/Global-Shift/Peter-Dicken/9781462519552/contents

      3. 15. Global networks and responsibility 9 items
        This lecture will explore the concept of Global Production Networks (GPNs) to consider how the complex formations of transnational production might form a basis for a range of actors, including consumers, to take political responsibility for distant others. GPNs draw attention to how connections along the value chain as well as places and territories shape the production process. We will question whether connection to others in distant places through GPNs constitutes a basis for political responsibility to workers, the environment and other affected groups in these places. We will specifically consider Iris Marion Young’s assessment of political responsibility based on connections. Can connections form a new basis for politics?
        1. Essential reading 4 items
          1. Introduction: Politicizing Consumption in an Unequal World

            Chapter Essential E-book. Please read chapter 1, especially the section 1.2 'Justice, Responsibility and the Politics of Consumption'.

          2. Geographies of Responsibility - Doreen Massey 2004

            Article Essential E-journal

          3. From guilt to solidarity - Young, Iris Spring 2003

            Article Essential E-journal

        2. Recommended reading 3 items
          1. Global production networks: realizing the potential - N. M. Coe, P. Dicken, M. Hess 29/02/2008

            Article Recommended E-journal

        3. Preparation: 2 items
          In preparation for Lecture 2 of this module, please explore the following website www.followthethings.com and watch the video at http://storyofstuff.org/movies/story-of-stuff/. This website also has more resources for you to explore.
          1. The Story of Stuff - written by Annie Leonard, Louis Fox, and Jonah Sachs, directed by Louis Fox and produced by Free Range Studios. Executive Producers included Tides Foundation and the Funders Workgroup for Sustainable Production and Consumption. December 2007

            Webpage 

      4. 16: Markets: Fair trade and capitalism 9 items
        This lecture will explore the Fair Trade movement as one response to the desire to take responsibility for the power imbalances and unequal outcomes of global production processes. We will consider two examples of Fair Trade – wine certification and Fair Trade coffee – in order to assess the limits of Fair Trade in a capitalist system and in relation to persistent historical inequalities and power relations shaping production processes and market access in different contexts. We will consider how wider world trading relations are stacked against poorer countries, so even with Fair trade GPNs, global trade relations might be considered to be very unfair.
        1. Essential reading 6 items
          1. Ethical spaces - Keith Woodward

            Chapter Essential E-book. This chapter can be found in Part 3 'Horizons', section 4.

        2. Recommended reading 3 items
          1. Connecting the Complex Lived Worlds of Fairtrade - Agatha Herman 12/2010

            Article Recommended E-journal

          2. Globalism's discontents - J E Stiglitz

            Chapter Recommended E-book. This chapter can be found under part IV in this book, ch27, p218

      5. 17. Individuals: Responsibility and Generosity 9 items
        Are connections enough to consider questions of responsibility? We explore this in two ways. Firstly, just because individuals are connected does not mean they can or want to take responsibility along global consumption and production networks. We will look in detail at how apparently individual consumer choices concerning Fair Trade are relational: embedded in shared understandings, social relationships, places and organisations. This shapes whether and how people can engage with the politics of responsibility. We look at evidence about individual choices, and the example of Bristol becoming a Fair Trade City. Secondly, the politics of responsibility does not stop with being connected. We will focus in on the subjective processes shaping a politics of responsibility through looking at the case of the outpouring of generosity in response to the 2004 Tsunami. Even so, there is a need to be alert to new power relations brought into being through the taking of responsibility, such as in the relationships forged to disburse humanitarian aid – this will be considered in the final lecture. To explore “responsibility without connections”, we will draw in new geographical terms focussing on relational and topological space, such as “reach”, “proximity”, “folding”.
        1. Essential reading 5 items
          1. Globalizing Responsibility - Clive Barnett, Paul Cloke, Nick Clarke, Alice Malpass 03/12/2010

            Book Essential E-book. Please read chapters 5, 6 and 7.

          2. Geographies of generosity: Beyond the ‘moral turn’ - Clive Barnett, David Land 11/2007

            Article Essential E-journal.

          3. Antinomies of generosity - Benedikt Korf 2007-3

            Article Essential E-journal

          4. Fairtrade Urbanism? The Politics of Place Beyond Place in the Bristol Fairtrade City Campaign - Alice Malpass, Paul Cloke, Clive Barnett, Nick Clarke 09/2007

            Article Essential E-journal

        2. Recommended reading 3 items
          1. Topologies of Power - John Allen 2016-1-13

            Book Recommended E-book. Please read chapters 1,2,3,and 4.

          2. Extending Hospitality: Giving Space, Taking Time - Mustafa Dikeç, Nigel Clark and Clive Barnett 2009

            Article Recommended E-journal

        3. In preparation for next week’s lecture please read the following article: 1 item
          1. Tourists go home, refugees welcome - Stephen Burgen 25 06 2018

            Article  Newspaper article

      6. 18. Institutions: Global geographies of humanitarianism and co-operation 10 items
        In the final lecture for this module we focus on the institutions associated with the politics of taking responsibility. We will consider different geographical scales and interactions amongst them – international organisations, states, cities, individuals. We will start by drawing on lectures 2 and 3 (on markets and individuals) to explore how international NGOs and fair trade organisations link individuals and geopolitics as they seek to mobilise public opinion to campaign and shape the institutions and agendas of international development and humanitarianism. We will look then at the wider political agendas which are entrained in morally grounded demands for states and international bodies to take action. What are the geopolitics of taking responsibility and humanitarian interventions in a changing world political order? And we will look beyond national governments at the growing role of cities as places of refuge. This confronts us with the more immediate politics of taking responsibility at an individual scale for (no longer) distant others, displaced and relocated within urban areas. It is a reminder that the politics of responsibility often falls at this individual scale, on the most vulnerable themselves.
        1. Essential reading 7 items
          1. Globalizing Responsibility - Clive Barnett, Paul Cloke, Nick Clarke, Alice Malpass 03/12/2010

            Book Essential Please read chapters 4 and 8.

          2. Refugees and the City: The Twenty-first-century Front Line. World Refugee Council Research Paper no. 2 - Robert Muggah, Robert Muggah, Adriana Erthal Abdenur 07/2018

            Document Essential Please read pages 1-13.

        2. Recommended reading 3 items
          1. Ethical Food Consumption and the City - Laura Pottinger 09/2013

            Article Recommended

    3. Seminars 5 items
      These will be held Mondays 2-3pm, 3-4pm, 4-5pm. Two classes will run in each slot in weeks 22 (21st Jan), 24 (4th Feb), 27 (25th Feb), 29 (11th March) in either PB 304 or BW 113.
      1. Seminar 1 readings 3 items
        1. Space as a Keyword - D. Harvey

          Chapter  This chapter is also in the e-book below.

      2. Seminar 2 readings 1 item
        1. Conceptualizing detention - Alison Mountz, Kate Coddington, R. Tina Catania, Jenna M. Loyd 08/2013

          Article  E-journal

      3. Seminar 3 readings 1 item
      4. Seminar 4: Discussion of summative essay 0 items
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