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This list relates to the academic year Academic Year 2014/15 which ended on 01/07/2015
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  1. Basic Texts 5 items
    1. Picts, Gaels and Scots: early historic Scotland - Foster, Sally M. 1996

      Book 

    2. Early Historic Britain - C. Hills

      Chapter  Digitised Reading

    3. Later Anglo-Saxon England: life & landscape - Reynolds, Andrew 1999

      Book 

    4. English Heritage book of Anglo-Saxon England - Welch, Martin G., English Heritage 1992

      Book 

  2. 1. and 2. Andrew Reynolds: Introduction 9 items
    This session will discuss the information and procedures presented in this Course Handbook and explain the aims and objectives and the organisation of the course. This session will examine terminology and regions for the period as well as the range and nature of the archaeological evidence to be studied and will then discuss some of the core publications and the range of contemporary written sources for the period.
    1. Reading:- 9 items
      1. The Anglo-Saxons - Campbell, James, John, Eric, Wormald, Patrick 1982

        Book 

      2. Wales in the early Middle Ages - Davies, Wendy 1982

        Book 

      3. Picts, Gaels and Scots: early historic Scotland - Foster, Sally M. 1996

        Book 

      4. Vikings in Scotland - Graham-Campbell, James, Batey, Colleen E. 1998

        Book 

      5. Early Historic Britain - C. Hills

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

      6. The pace of change: studies in early-Medieval chronology - Hines, John, Nielsen, Karen Høilund, Siegmund, Frank 1999

        Book 

      7. Archaeology: theories, methods and practice - Renfrew, Colin, Bahn, Paul G. 2000

        Book 

      8. English Heritage book of Anglo-Saxon England - Welch, Martin G., English Heritage 1992

        Book 

  3. 3. Andrew Gardner: The Transformation of Roman Britain I: the 4th century 13 items
    Understanding changes within the Roman period in Britain is essential if we are to make sense of what comes afterwards without falling into the old stereotypes of a high civilization collapsing into the dark ages. Romano-British society in the 4th century was quite different to that of the 2nd century, and we can chart these changes by looking at the archaeology of towns, rural settlement, and the military. We will also look at Britain's character as a frontier area, open to contact with other frontier cultures developing on both sides of the empire's European boundaries.
    1. Reading:- 13 items
      1. The golden age of Roman Britain - De la Bédoyère, Guy 1999

        Book 

      2. The ending of Roman Britain - Esmonde Cleary, A. S. 1989

        Book 

      3. Decline and fall of Roman Britain - Faulkner, Neil 2000

        Book 

      4. An archaeology of identity: soldiers and society in late Roman Britain - Gardner, Andrew 2007

        Book 

      5. An imperial possession: Britain in the Roman Empire, 54 BC-AD 409 - Mattingly, D. J. 2006

        Book  Chapters 8,11,17

      6. Epilogue: Decline and Fall? - Martin Millett

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

      7. My Roman Britain - Reece, Richard 1988

        Book 

      8. Late Roman towns in Britain: rethinking change and decline - Rogers, Adam 2011

        Book 

      9. Britannia Prima: Britain's last Roman province - White, Roger H. 2007

        Book 

  4. 4. Andrew Gardner: The Transforamation of Roman Britain II: the 5th century 11 items
    Having established the main trends in 4th century Romano-British life, we must examine whether these continued into the 5th century, or whether there was a more abrupt change linked to the abandonment of Britain by elements of the imperial Roman administration. The evidence for the 5th and early 6th centuries is notoriously difficult, and we will compare archaeological and historical sources, including key sites like Wroxeter and the writings of Gildas. Scholarly opinion is divided on this period precisely because the evidence supports multiple interpretation, and one explanation for this may be that a markedly regional pattern of variation developed, with continuity and even reinvention of Roman practices in some areas being much stronger than in others.
    1. Reading:- 11 items
      1. Finds from the frontier: material culture in the 4th-5th centuries - Collins, Rob, Allason-Jones, Lindsay 2010

        Book 

      2. Debating late antiquity in Britain AD 300-700 - Collins, Rob, Gerrard, James 2004

        Book 

      3. Britain and the end of the Roman Empire - Dark, K. R. 2000

        Book 

      4. An age of tyrants: Britain and the Britons, A.D. 400-600 - Snyder, Christopher A. 1998

        Book 

      5. Wroxeter: life and death of a Roman city - White, Roger H., Barker, Philip 1998

        Book 

      6. The ruin of Britain, and other works - Gildas, Winterbottom, Michael 1978

        Book 

  5. 5. Andrew Reynolds: South-west England and Wales: high-status settlements 27 items
    South-West England, from Dorset and Somerset westwards, (known as Dummonia) was a part of Britain which was not substantially settled by Anglo-Saxons until much later than the Hampshire/Thames region to the East. British elites remained prominent in the 5th and 6th centuries. Sites such as South Cadbury, Cadbury Congresbury, Tintagel, and Castle Dore show evidence of high-status settlements of this period, characterised by finds of Mediterranean pottery (A and B wares); Western Gaulish D and E wares are later evidence for Atlantic trade in this region. Similar patterns to south-western Britiain are observed in Scotland and Wales where iron age hillforts were also re-occupied and where important materials are an important archaeological indicator of high-status settlement.
    1. Reading:- 15 items
      1. Cadbury Castle, Somerset: the early Medieval archaeology - Alcock, Leslie, Stevenson, S. J., Musson, C. R. 1995

        Book 

      2. Cadbury Castle, Somerset: the later prehistoric and early historical archaeology - Barrett, John C., Freeman, Philip, Woodward, Ann, Alcock, Leslie 2000

        Book 

      3. Tintagel - C.D. Morris 1998

        Article 

      4. South western Britain in the early Middle Ages - Pearce, Susan M. 2004

        Book 

      5. Cadbury Congresbury 1968-73: a late/post-Roman hilltop settlement in Somerset - Rahtz, Philip A., Barraclough, Marion 1992

        Book 

      6. Celtic Britain - Thomas, Charles 1986

        Book 

      7. English heritage book of Tintagel: Arthur and archaeology - Thomas, Charles, English Heritage 1993

        Book 

    2. Wales presents a complex mixture of British continuity, Irish immigration and early Christianity in the 5th to 7th centuries. Dinas Powys, Llangorse Crannog, Coygan Camp, Dinorben, Dinas Emrys and Deganwy, Pant-y-Saer, Garn Boduan, Longbury Bank and Walesland Rath are some of the principal excavation sites. Ogham inscriptions and circular churchyards, together with historical evidence for monasteries such as Bangor-is-y-Coed, will be examined.

    3. Reading:- 11 items
      1. Wales in the early Middle Ages - Davies, Wendy 1982

        Book 

      2. The early Christian monuments of Wales - Nash-Williams, V. E. 1950

        Book 

      3. The Christian Celts: treasures of late Celtic Wales - Redknap, M., National Museum of Wales 1991

        Book 

  6. 6. Andrew Reynolds: Picts, Scots and North Britons 12 items
    Picts, Scots, Gaels, North Britons, Angle- the ethnic complexity of Early Historic Scotland lies a the heart of its political development. Dunadd, Alt Clut (Dumbarton), the Mote of Mark, Dunollie, Dundurn, Edinburgh Castle, together with Pictish settlement and burial sites will covered, and Pictish and Dalriadic art and material culture introduced.
    1. Reading:- 12 items
      1. Saints and sea-kings: the first kingdom of the Scots - Campbell, Ewan, Historic Scotland 1999

        Book 

      2. Picts, Gaels and Scots: early historic Scotland - Foster, Sally M. 1996

        Book 

      3. Power and politics in early medieval Britain and Ireland - Driscoll, Stephen T., Nieke, Margaret R. c1988

        Book 

      4. The art of the Picts: sculpture and metalwork in early medieval Scotland - Henderson, George, Henderson, Isabel 2004

        Book 

      5. Dunadd: an early Dalriadic capital - Lane, Alan, Campbell, Ewan c2000

        Book 

      6. The age of migrating ideas: early medieval art in Northern Britain and Ireland - Spearman, Michael, Higgitt, John, International Conference on Insular Art, National Museums of Scotland 1993

        Book 

  7. 7. Andrew Reynolds: Early Anglo-Saxon Settlements 10 items
    This will survey the range of excavated evidence for settlements established between the fifth and seventh centuries. It will examine building types and their organisation into sub-units or farmsteads. There are two principal layouts associated with chalk landscapes on the one hand and with sand and gravel valley terraces on the other, represented by Chalton in Hampshire and West Stow in Suffolk.
    1. Reading:- 10 items
      1. The Anglo-Saxon house: a new review - P. V. Addyman 1972-1

        Article 

      2. Buildings and rural settlement - P Rahtz 1972

        Chapter 

      3. Excavations at Mucking: Vol.2: The Anglo-Saxon settlement - Hamerow, Helena, Jones, Margaret, Jones, Tom, Done, Geraldine 1993

        Book 

      4. The Grubenhaus in Anglo-Saxon England: an analysis and interpretation of the evidence from a most distinctive building type - Tipper, Jess, English Heritage, Landscape Research Centre (Yedingham, North Yorkshire) 2004

        Book 

      5. West Stow: the Anglo-Saxon Village - West, Stanley E., Cooper, Valerie, Suffolk (England) 1985

        Book 

  8. 8. Andrew Reynolds: Yeavering and other elite settlements of the Early to Middle Anglo-Saxon period 8 items
    The excavation and publication of Yeavering, identified with the royal vill of Ad Gefrin described by Bede (Ecclesiastical History), has provided the type site for so-called 'Palaces', marked out by their large halls. Most such sites have been identified from air photographs, but only a few of them have been excavated, even partially. The two halls revealed in Northampton were an unexpected byproduct of urban excavation of a pre-urban site complex associated with a minster church. The extent to which such sites should be treated as exclusively royal will be considered
    1. Reading:- 8 items
      1. Yeavering: an Anglo-British centre of early Northumbria - Brian Hope-Taylor distributor `1977'

        Book 

      2. Middle Saxon palaces at Northampton - John H. Williams, Varian Denham, Michael Shaw, Marion Archibald 1985

        Book 

  9. 9. Andrew Reynolds: The Tribal Hidage and the origins of kingdoms 6 items
    This will survey the range of evidence from documents, place-names and archaeology for the emergence of kingdoms and the existence of smaller polities referred to by Bede as provinces and regions in the seventh and eighth centuries. The Tribal Hidage is a key source here, together with Bede's Ecclesiastical History.
    1. Reading:- 6 items
      1. The Origins of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms - Bassett, S. R. 1989

        Book 

      2. An atlas of Anglo-Saxon England - Hill, David 1981

        Book 

      3. The landscape of Anglo-Saxon England - Hooke, Della 1998

        Book 

  10. 10. Andrew Reynolds: Middle and Late Anglo-Saxon rural settlements 31 items
    The lecture will begin with a survey of settlement evidence of the eighth to ninth centuries, looking at the increasing diversity of settlement types and the growing organisation, structure, and exploitation of the Middle Anglo-Saxon landscape. This changing attitude towards the landscape appears to have gone hand in hand with the desertion of many Early Anglo-Saxon settlements in the 'Middle Saxon Shift'. Flixborough, Cheddar, and other later Anglo-Saxon settlements are then examined. The lecture discusses royal/aristocratic/manorial and ecclesiastical estate centres in the Middle and Later Anglo-Saxon period. It will look at the economic basis of these centres, their influence on the surrounding landscape, and the industries and technological advances associated with them.
    1. Middle Anglo-Saxon settlements 13 items
      1. Reading: 13 items
        1. Catholme: an Anglo-Saxon settlement on the Trent Gravels in Staffordshire - Losco-Bradley, Stuart, Kinsley, A. G. 2002

          Book 

        2. The early medieval settlement remains from Flixborough, Lincolnshire: the occupation sequence, c.AD 600-1000 - Loveluck, Christopher, Atkinson, David 2007

          Book  Volume 1

        3. Life and economy at early medieval Flixborough, c. AD 600-1000: the artefact evidence - D. H. Evans, Christopher Loveluck, Marion Archibald c2009

          Book  Volume 2

        4. The Saxon and medieval settlement at West Fen Road, Ely: the Ashwell site - Mortimer, Richard, Regan, Roderick, Lucy, Sam, Ballantyne, Rachel 2005

          Book 

        5. Pennyland and Hartigans: two Iron Age and Saxon sites in Milton Keynes - Williams, R. J., Green, H. Stephen, Zeepvat, R. J., Allen, D. 1993

          Book 

    2. Late Anglo-Saxon settlements Reading: 18 items
      1. Reading: 18 items
        1. Goltho: the development of an early medieval manor c850-1150 - Beresford, Guy, Geddes, J., English Heritage 1987

          Book 

        2. Introduction - Della Hooke

          Chapter  Esp. Introduction pp 1-8

        3. Markets in early medieval Europe: trading and 'productive' sites, 650-850 - Pestell, Tim, Ulmschneider, Katharina c2003

          Book 

        4. The Saxon and Medieval palaces at Cheddar: excavations 1960-62 - Rahtz, Philip A., Anderson, F. W., Hirst, Susan 1979

          Book 

        5. A late neolithic, Saxon and medieval site at Middle Harling, Norfolk - Rogerson, Andrew, Archibald, Marion, Norfolk Archaeological Unit (Norfolk, England), Norfolk Museums Service 1995

          Book 

        6. Middle Saxon palaces at Northampton - Williams, John H., Denham, Varian, Shaw, Michael, Archibald, Marion 1985

          Book 

        7. Wessex in the early Middle Ages - Yorke, Barbara 1995

          Book 

  11. 11. Stuart Brookes:International trading settlements in Middle Anglo-Saxon England 11 items
    This session surveys the evidence for a group of exceptional Middle Anglo-Saxon settlements referred to by Bede as 'emporia', which were heavily involved in foreign trade and exchange. The lecture will look at the archaeological evidence for craft, industry, and trade at these places, discuss their functions and roles, their contacts with similar sites on the Continent, and reasons for their demise during the end of the Middle Saxon period.
    1. Reading:- 11 items
      1. Anglo-Saxon trading centres: beyond the emporia - Anderton, Mike, Conference on the emporia written about in Richard Hodge's "Dark Age Economics" 1999

        Book 

      2. Wics: the early medieval trading centres of northern Europe - Hill, David, Cowie, Robert c2001

        Book 

      3. Towns and trade in the age of Charlemagne - Hodges, Richard 2000

        Book 

      4. The rebirth of towns in the West AD 700-1050: a review of current research into how, when, and why there was a rebirth of towns between 700 and 1050 - Hodges, Richard, Hobley, Brian, Joint CBA/DUA International Conference on the Rebirth of Towns in the West, AD 700-1050, Council for British Archaeology 1988

        Book  Chapters 1,11,13,14 and 17

      5. Markets in early medieval Europe: trading and 'productive' sites, 650-850 - Pestell, Tim, Ulmschneider, Katharina c2003

        Book 

      6. The Anglo-Saxon Towns of Kent - T Tatton-Brown

        Chapter 

      7. KEY SITES: Ipswich (Gippeswic), London (Lundenwic), Southampton (Hamwic), York (Eoforwic)

  12. 12. Stuart Brookes: The Burghal Hidage and Later Anglo-Saxon towns 7 items
    The Burghal Hidage documents a list of 'burgs' (or fortifications) established during the reign of King Alfred, which formed part of a defensive network against the Vikings. The lecture discusses the archaeological evidence for these sites in southern England, looking at their layout, construction, and the evidence for urban development. A short overview of urban developments in the Danelaw will also be given.
    1. Reading:- 7 items
      1. Late Saxon planned towns - M Biddle, D Hill, H Clarke 1971

        Article 

      2. Towns in the Viking age - Clarke, Helen, Ambrosiani, Björn 1990

        Book 

      3. Anglo-Saxon towns in southern England - Haslam, Jeremy 1984

        Book 

      4. The defence of Wessex: the Burghal Hidage and Anglo-Saxon fortifications - Hill, David, Rumble, Alexander R., Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies 1996

        Book 

  13. 13 and 14. Justine Bayley: Craft, industry and technology in post-Roman Britain I and II 18 items
    These sessions will start by discussing how the terms craft, industry and technology can be used to describe the manufacture of portable objects in the British Isles in early medieval times. Objects were made of a wide range of materials but the organic ones such as wood, leather and textiles often do not survive well in archaeological contexts. Inorganic materials such as stone, ceramics, glass and metals are usually better preserved, as it the associated manufacturing debris. The varied physical evidence for artefact production and how it can be used to reconstruct the processes involved will then be explored using a number of case studies relating to non-ferrous metal and glass working. Documentary sources of information will also be considered.
    1. Reading:- 16 items
      1. The Archaeology of York: Vol.17: The small finds - Addyman, P. V., Babley, Justine, Council for British Archaeology, York Archaeological Trust 1992

        Book 

      2. English medieval industries: craftsmen, techniques, products - Blair, John, Ramsay, Nigel 1991

        Book 

      3. On divers arts: the foremost medieval treatise on painting, glassmaking and metalwork - Theophilus, Hawthorne, John G., Smith, Cyril Stanley 1979

        Book 

      4. A smith in Lindsey: the Anglo-Saxon grave at Tattershall Thorpe, Lincolnshire - Hinton, David Alban, Appleyard, H. M., Society for Medieval Archaeology 2000

        Book 

      5. Anglo-Saxon crafts - Kevin Leahy 2003

        Book 

      6. Medieval pottery in Britain, AD 900-1600 - McCarthy, Michael R., Brooks, Catherine M. 1988

        Book 

      7. Craft and industry - D.M. Wilson

        Chapter 

    2. Multi-period introductions to metalworking 2 items
      1. Metals and metalworking: a research framework for archaeometallurgy - Bayley, J., Crossley, David W., Ponting, Matthew, Historical Metallurgy Society 2008

        Book 

      2. Archaeometallurgy - Jones, David M., Historic England 2001

        Book 

  14. 15 and 16 Andrew Reynolds: Social organisation and the Late Anglo-Saxon landscape 8 items
    The rise of lordship in the later Anglo-Saxon period had a profound influence on the landscape and society. It is during this period that we witness the nucleation of settlements of the creation of open fields. The lecture will look at how the Late Anglo-Saxon landscape was governed, discussing topics such as territorial arrangements, the judicial system, communication, and defence.
    1. Reading:- 8 items
      1. An Anglo Saxon beacon system - D. Hill, S. Sharp

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

      2. The landscape of Anglo-Saxon England - Hooke, Della 1998

        Book 

      3. Later Anglo-Saxon England: life & landscape - Reynolds, Andrew 1999

        Book  Chapter 3 pg 65-110

      4. Assembly places and practices in medieval Europe - Pantos, Aliki, Semple, Sarah c2004

        Book 

  15. 17 and 18: John Clark: Interpreting the evidence of artefacts 68 items
    This 'handling session' to be held at the London Archaeological Archive and Research Centre (LAARC) will give students an opportunity to examine at first hand a range of Early Medieval material from London, to consider problems of typology and chronological development, materials and methods of manufacture, function and significance. It will include ceramics, metalwork and organic materials. It will comprise both items from the Museum of London's core medieval collection (including finds from the Thames and chance finds made in the 19th and early 20th centuries), and selected material from some 40 years of archaeological excavations in London now held in the Archaeological Archive. ' ......a cross-section of the things in everyday use in medieval England, sufficiently rich and varied to be fully representative but not so rich as to be divorced from common practice': Mortimer Wheeler writing of the London Museum's medieval collection in 1940.
    1. To get to the LAARC, please follow this link for a map:

       

    2. Historical perspectives 5 items
      1. Medieval archaeology: understanding traditions and contemporary approaches - Gerrard, Christopher M. 2003

        Book  Pages indexed under 'artefacts' and 'pottery' in particular throw light on the role the study of artefactual evidence has played in the context of the overall historical development of medieval archaeology.

      2. London and the Vikings - London Museum 1927

        Book 

      3. Medieval catalogue - Mortimer Wheeler, J. B. Ward-Perkins, London Museum 1940

        Book 

      4. London and the Saxons - Wheeler, Robert Eric Mortimer, London Museum 1935

        Book  These three London Museum catalogues, the first two written by Mortimer Wheeler, the last largely by John Ward Perkins, comprise what were then new approaches to the study of medieval artefacts, as well as presenting an overview of the range and the provenance of the material that, until the beginnings of large-scale archaeological excavation of London urban sites in the 1970s made up the bulk of the early medieval collections in the Museum of London. (The facsimile reprint of the 1940 Medieval Catalogue (Ipswich:Anglia Publishing 1993) has a new introduction (pp iii-vii) setting the book in its historical context.)

      5. The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England - Wilson, David M. 1981, c1976

        Book  Chapters 6 'Craft and industry' and 7 'The pottery' summarise the understanding of these topics that was current in the 1970s.

    3. The London early medieval material 3 items
      1. Aspects of Saxo-Norman London: 2: Finds and environmental evidence - Vince, A. G., London and Middlesex Archaeological Society 1991

        Book  Read the Introduction by Alan Vince for an explanation of the decision to publish a volume devoted specifically to finds, rather than including them in site-by-site excavation reports, as well as Part 3, 'Small Finds'.

      2. Middle Saxon London: excavations at the Royal Opera House 1989-99 - Malcolm, Gordon, Bowsher, David, Cowie, Robert c2003

        Book 

    4. The London Archaeological Archive and Research Centre (LAARC) 1 item
      1. For the background to LAARC see the website:

        http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/Collections-Research/LAARC/

        and follow the blogs at:

        http://www.mymuseumoflondon.org.uk/blogs/blog/category/laarc/

    5. Pottery 15 items
      1. Medieval pottery in Britain - Jeremy Haslam c1984

        Book 

      2. The Pottery - Hurst J.G.

        Chapter 

      3. Medieval pottery in Britain, AD 900-1600 - Michael R. McCarthy, Catherine M. Brooks 1988

        Book  Chapters 1-4

      4. The archaeology of York: Vol.16: The pottery - Addyman, P. V., Mainman, A. J., Council for British Archaeology, York Archaeological Trust 1990

        Book 

      5. A late Saxon kiln site at Silver Street, Lincoln - Miles, Paul, Young, Jane, Wacher, J. S., Council for British Archaeology 1989

        Book 

      6. Medieval pottery kilns - J. Musty

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

      7. A corpus of Anglo-Saxon and medieval pottery from Lincoln - Young, Jane, Vince, A. G., Nailor, Victoria, Lincoln (England) 2005

        Book 

    6. Other Artifacts 35 items
      1. The Archaeology of York: Vol.17: The small finds - Addyman, P. V., Babley, Justine, Council for British Archaeology, York Archaeological Trust 1992

        Book 

      2. Life and economy at early medieval Flixborough, c. AD 600-1000: the artefact evidence - Evans, D. H., Loveluck, Christopher, Archibald, Marion c2009

        Book  Excavations at Flixborough 2

      3. Viking Age ringed pins from Dublin - Fanning, Thomas, National Museum of Ireland, Royal Irish Academy 1994

        Book 

      4. Objects of Copper Alloy and Lead - A.R. Goodall

        Chapter 

      5. Objects of Iron - I.H. Goodall

        Chapter 

      6. Two Groups of Ninth-Century Irish Brooches - James Graham-Campbell 1972

        Article 

      7. The Viking world - Graham-Campbell, James 1980

        Book 

      8. A smith in Lindsey: the Anglo-Saxon grave at Tattershall Thorpe, Lincolnshire - Hinton, David Alban, Appleyard, H. M., Society for Medieval Archaeology 2000

        Book 

      9. The city by the pool: assessing the archaeology of the city of Lincoln - Jones, Michael J., Stocker, D. A., Vince, A. G. 2003

        Book 

      10. Anglo-Saxon crafts - Leahy, Kevin 2003

        Book 

      11. The Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Lindsey - Leahy, Kevin 2007

        Book 

      12. Objects of Bone and Antler - A MacGregor

        Chapter  Digitised reading

      13. Craft, industry and everyday life: bone, antler, ivory and horn from Anglo-Scandinavian and medieval York - MacGregor, Arthur, Mainman, A. J., Rogers, Nicola S. H., York Archaeological Trust 1999

        Book 

      14. The Vikings in Norfolk - Margeson, Susan M. 1997

        Book 

      15. Saxon & Viking artefacts - Nigel Mills c2012

        Book 

      16. The archaeology of York: Vol.17: The small finds - Addyman, P. V., Morris, Carole A., Council for British Archaeology, York Archaeological Trust 2000

        Book 

      17. The archaeology of York: Vol.17: The small finds - Ottaway, Patrick, Addyman, P. V., Council for British Archaeology, York Archaeological Trust 1992

        Book 

      18. Dress in Anglo-Saxon England - Owen-Crocker, Gale R. c1986

        Book  Sections on late Anglo-Saxon dress accessories

      19. The archaeology of York: Vol.17: The small finds - Addyman, P. V., Rogers, Penelope Walton, Council for British Archaeology, York Archaeological Trust 1997

        Book 

      20. Cloth and clothing in early Anglo-Saxon England, AD 450-700 - Rogers, Penelope Walton, Council for British Archaeology 2007

        Book 

      21. Late Saxon stirrup-strap mounts: a classification and catalogue - Williams, David, Council for British Archaeology 1997

        Book 

      22. Catalogue of antiquities of the later Saxon period: volume 1: Anglo-Saxon ornamental metalwork 700-1100 in the British Museum - Wilson, David M., Page, R. I., Bruce-Mitford, Rupert Leo Scott, British Museum 1964

        Book 

      23. Craft and Industry - D.M. Wilson

        Chapter 

    7. General theory and methodology 7 items
      1. Archaeology and the Meanings of Material Culture - N.L. Guarinello

        Chapter 

      2. The cultural biography of objects - Chris Gosden, Yvonne Marshall 10/1999

        Article 

      3. The Expanding Role of Surface Assemblages in Archaeological Research - Dennis E. Lewarch and Michael J. O'Brien 1981

        Article 

  16. 19. Andrew Reynolds: Vikings in Scotland 12 items
    Orkney and Shetland in particular show strong Norse influence: the Viking settlement of the northern isles was probably the earliest in the British Isles: The Brough of Birsay, Buckquoy, Jarlshof and Pool are some examples of sites where Norse settlement took place immediately about earlier settlements. This also took place in the Hebrides - recent work on the Uists has added much to our previous picture from sites such as the Udal. The Viking presence in Scotland was patchy, but very intense in some parts of the Northern and Western Isles and Caithness, and isolated parts fothe N,E and S W mainland, together with the Isle of Man to the south. The later presence of a settled Norse cultural landscape in the Earldom of Orkney will examined, but elsewhere, the Viking influence was diluted/assimilated - this importance of understanding this process will stressed.
    1. Reading:- 12 items
      1. Vikings in Scotland - Graham-Campbell, James, Batey, Colleen E. 1998

        Book 

      2. Scandinavian Scotland - Crawford, B. E. 1987

        Book 

      3. The Viking-age gold and silver of Scotland, (AD 850-1100) - Graham-Campbell, James, Bateson, Donal, National Museums of Scotland 1995

        Book 

      4. Land, sea and home: proceedings of a Conference on Viking-period Settlement, at Cardiff, July 2001 - John Hines, Alan Lane, M. Redknap, Conference on Viking-period Settlement 2004

        Book 

      5. Viking Orkney: A survey - C. D. Morris

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

      6. Orkney and Shetland - Ritchie, Anna, Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland 1985

        Book 

      7. Viking Scotland - Ritchie, Anna, Historic Scotland 1993

        Book 

      8. Norse and later settlement and subsistence in the North Atlantic - Morris, Christopher D., Rackham, D. James, University of Glasgow 1992

        Book 

  17. 20. Andrew Reynolds: Vikings in England 12 items
    From the famous raid on Lindisfarne in 793 to the reign of Cnut (1016-35), and the battle of Stamford Bridge (1066) England (and parts of Wales) was subject to waves of Scandinavian influence, cultural, political and economic, coming both from the North Sea to the East and the Irish Sea to the West. Raids and attacks, settlement, trade, urbanisation and material culture will be covered, with emphasis on interpreting the evidence for a Scandinavian presence against the background of a closely-related Anglo-Saxon culture. The spread of Scandinavian place-names will be studied in the context of identifying areas of Viking settlement. Evidence from excavations at Repton, Ingleby York, Goltho, Chester, Ribblehead and Llanbedrgoch (N. Wales) will be considered.
    1. Reading:- 12 items
      1. Viking treasure from the North West: the Cuerdale Hoard in its context - Graham-Campbell, James, National Museums and Galleries on Merseyside, Vikings of the Irish Sea Conference 1992

        Book 

      2. Cultural atlas of the Viking world - Batey, Colleen E., Graham-Campbell, James c1994

        Book 

      3. Vikings and the Danelaw - Graham-Campbell, James, Viking Congress c2001

        Book 

      4. English Heritage Book of Viking age York - Hall, Richard, English Heritage 1994

        Book 

      5. Land, sea and home: proceedings of a Conference on Viking-period Settlement, at Cardiff, July 2001 - Hines, John, Lane, Alan, Redknap, M., Conference on Viking-period Settlement 2004

        Book 

      6. Vikings in Wales: an archaeological quest - Redknap, M. 2000

        Book 

      7. The English Heritage book of Viking Age England - Richards, J. D., English Heritage 1991

        Book 

  18. 21.Sue Harrington: Early Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries: inhumations, weapons and dress fittings 4 items
    A majority of inhumation burials in the fifth and sixth centuries were furnished with artefacts which we interpret as related directly to the gender of the decreased individual. Typically half of all adult males are buried with at least one weapon (but rather fewer in northern England). More than half of adult women are wearing dress fittings consisting of items such as brooches, beads, buckles, purses and other items hanging from the girdle, though the 'poorest' may only have a few beads and carry a knife. This lecture will examine the range of material and how we might analyse it in order to interpret something of the lives of the deceased, and how the evidence changes over time and space.
    1. Readings:- 4 items
      1. Angelsächsische Waffengräber des 5. bis 7. Jahrhunderts - Härke, Heinrich G. H. 1992

        Book 

      2. Anglo-Saxon cemeteries 1979 - Rahtz, Philip A., Dickenson, Tania M., Watts, Lorna, Anglo-Saxon Symposium at Oxford 1980

        Book 

  19. 22. Sue Harrington: Early Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries: Cremation and handmade pottery 5 items
    Large cremation urnfields using pottery containers are a significant feature of eastern and northern England in this period, although there are many mixed burial rite cemeteries else where. The evidence for cremation practice, pottery manufacture and distribution will be vessels. How can we interpret this perhaps unpromising material to aid our understanding of social structures in this period?
    1. Reading:- 5 items
      1. The Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Spong Hill, North Elmham: Part 8: The cremations - McKinley, Jacqueline I., Bond, Julie, Rickett, Robert 1994

        Book 

  20. 23. Chris Scull: Sutton Hoo and 'princely burials' 12 items
    'Princely Graves', which display extreme wealth and monumentality, are a phenomenon of the burial record in England the later 6th and earlier 7th centuries. They indicate new levels of social and political eminence, and may be interpreted as representing the ruling elites of the regional polities (or kingdoms) attested in the historical record from the later 6th century. The burials are discussed with particular reference to Sutton Hoo and Snape (Suffolk), Prittlewell (Essex), Taplow (Buckinghamshire) and Asthall (Oxfordshire), How and Why did these people advertise their power and prestige through their burials? How did these social and political changes come about?
    1. Reading:- 12 items
      1. The Origins of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms - Bassett, S. R. 1989

        Book 

      2. The Sutton Hoo ship-burial: Vol.1: Excavations, background, the ship, dating and inventory - Bruce-Mitford, Rupert Leo Scott, British Museum 1975

        Book 

      3. The Sutton Hoo ship-burial: Vol.2: Arms, armour and regalia - Bruce-Mitford, Rupert Leo Scott, Bimson, M., British Museum 1978

        Book 

      4. Sutton Hoo: burial ground of kings? - Carver, M. O. H. c1998

        Book 

      5. Sutton Hoo: a seventh-century princely burial ground and its context - Carver, M. O. H., Evans, Angela, Society of Antiquaries of London c2005

        Book 

      6. Snape Anglo-Saxon cemetery: excavations and surveys 1824-1992 - Filmer-Sankey, William, Pestell, Tim, Anderson, Sue, Archer, Rebecca 2001

        Book 

  21. 24. Chris Scull: The Final Phase and the conversion to Christianity 11 items
    Changes in burial practice during the later 6th and 7th centuries culminated in the abandonment of formal furnished inhumation. Graves of this period have been characterized as representing a 'Final Phase' (of Furnished Burial)., and the changes attributed to a range of causes including conversion to Christianity and cultural alignment with the Merovingian continent. The evidence is discussed in the light of recent research and against the longer term perspective of Anglo-Saxon mortuary practice from the 6th to the 9th centuries. How useful are the terms used to describe 7th century burial practices?
    1. Reading:- 11 items
      1. The church in Anglo-Saxon society - Blair, John 2005

        Book  Esp 228-240

      2. Late Saxon burial practice - D Hadley

        Chapter 

      3. The Final Phase - E. T. Leeds

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

      4. Two Anglo-Saxon cemeteries at Winnall, Winchester, Hampshire - Meaney, Audrey L., Hawkes, Sonia Chadwick, Society for Medieval Archaeology 1970

        Book 

      5. Early medieval (late 5th-early 8th centuries AD) cemeteries at Boss Hall and Buttermarket, Ipswich, Suffolk - Scull, Christopher, Archibald, Marion, Society for Medieval Archaeology c2009

        Book 

      6. The Mid Saxon 'Final Phase' - M Welch

        Chapter 

  22. 25. Michael Shapland: Anglo Saxon Churches 9 items
    This lecture surveys the archaeology of the Anglo Saxon church from the conversion period to the Norman Conquest. It discusses the archaeological, architectural, and historical evidence for minsters or mother churches in the Middle Saxon landscape and traces their subsequent demise in importance in the wake of the emergence of the local parish church during the Late Saxon period.
    1. Reading:- 9 items
      1. The church in Anglo-Saxon society - Blair, John 2005

        Book 

      2. Agency, intellect and the archaeological agenda - M.O.H. Carver

        Chapter 

      3. Church architecture - R. Gem

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

      4. Anglo-Saxon architecture - Taylor, H. M., Taylor, Joan 78/1965

        Book 

  23. 26. Michael Shapland: Anglo Saxon monasteries 27 items
    Early Anglo Saxon and northern sites. This lecture surveys the archaeological evidence for early monastic sites in the kingdom of Northumbria in the age of Bede and in Scotland. It will look at their architecture and furnishings, pastoral role and economic functions, and discuss the different cultural traditions that provided the basis for what has become known as the Northumbrian 'Renaissance'. The development of Christian sites in Scotland is seen against the historical background of the Celtic ( Columban) church in the West and the Northumbrian Church in the south. Whithorn and Kirkmadrine in the SW are possibly Scotland's earliest (sub-Roman/British) sites, which later came under Northumbrian influence. Iona, together with smaller island monasteries and ermitical cells in the west, were closely connected to the Irish church. To the north, Pictish sites int he Moray and Orkney regions such as Tarbat and Birsay later came under Norse influence.
    1. Reading:- 12 items
      1. St Wilfred, Ripon and Hexham - R.N. Bailey

        Chapter 

      2. The church in Anglo-Saxon society - Blair, John 2005

        Book 

      3. Monasteries - R Cramp

        Chapter  And appendix B and C

      4. Wearmouth and Jarrow monastic sites - Rosemary Cramp, G. Bettess 2005-2006

        Book 

      5. Whithorn and St. Ninian: excavations of a monastic town, 1984-91 - Hill, Peter, Whithorn Trust 1997

        Book 

      6. Excavations in Iona 1964 to 1974 - Reece, Richard, University of London 1981

        Book 

      7. Iona - Ritchie, Anna, Historic Scotland 1997

        Book 

      8. The Skeith Stone, Upper Kilrenny, Fife - R Trench-Jellicoe 1998

        Article 

    2. Later Anglo-Saxon monasteries 15 items
      This lecture traces the archaeological evidence for early ecclesiastical sites in the south of England. It discusses the impact of the late 8th and 9th century Viking attacks and depredations on religious life, and surveys the effects of the mid-10th century Benedictine reform movement on the architecture and archaeology of monastic sites.
      1. Reading:- 15 items
        1. The church in Anglo-Saxon society - Blair, John 2005

          Book 

        2. Canterbury Cathedral nave: archaeology, history and architecture - Blockley, Kevin, Sparks, Margaret, Anderson, Ian, Tatton-Brown, T. W. T. 1997

          Book 

        3. Monastic Sites - R. Cramp

          Chapter  Digitised Reading

        4. Wearmouth and Jarrow monastic sites - Cramp, Rosemary, Bettess, G. 2005-2006

          Book 

        5. Archaeology, architecture, and the cult of saints in Anglo-Saxon England - M Biddle

          Chapter  Also Chapter by B. Kjolbye-Biddle, 196-209

        6. Aelfric's abbey: excavations at Eynsham Abbey, Oxfordshire, 1989-1992 - Hardy, Alan, Dodd, Anne, Keevill, G., Oxford Archaeological Unit c2003

          Book 

        7. The golden minster: the Anglo-Saxon minster and later medieval priory of St Oswald at Gloucester - Heighway, Carolyn M., Bryant, Richard, Boore, Eric, Council for British Archaeology 1999

          Book 

        8. Churches in the landscape - Morris, Richard 1989

          Book 

        9. Cirencester Anglo-Saxon church and medieval abbey - Wilkinson, David J., McWhirr, Alan, Cotswold Archaeology 1998

          Book 

        10. An important paper relating to archaeological readngs of architecture can be found in:

           

          Elizabeth DeMarrais, Luis Jaime Castillo and Timothy Earle, 'Ideology, Materialization, and Power Strategies'. Current Anthropology, Vol. 37, No. 1 (Feb.,1996), pp. 15-31. [library catalogue electronic resource]

           

        11. see also:

        12. Christian sacred spaces and places - M.O.H. Carver

          Chapter 

        13. Agency, intellect and the archaeological agenda - M.O.H. Carver

          Chapter 

  24. 27 and 28. Andrew Reynolds: Mid and Late Anglo-Saxon cemeteries I and II 6 items
    Unlike the richly adorned Early Saxon cemeteries, later Saxon burials were largely unfurnished, making it difficult for archaeologists to identify and date them. This lecture surveys the evidence for burial places and practices from the Conversion to the Late Saxon period and discusses recent advances in the study of these sites.
    1. Reading:- 6 items
      1. The church in Anglo-Saxon society - Blair, John 2005

        Book 

      2. Raunds furnells: the Anglo-Saxon church and churchyard - Boddington, A., English Heritage 1996

        Book 

      3. Burial in early medieval England and Wales - Lucy, Sam, Reynolds, Andrew, Society for Medieval Archaeology 2002

        Book 

  25. 29 and 30. Nathalie Cohen: London and the Thames in the Anglo-Saxon Period 1 item
    1. Reading to be provided

  26. 31 and 32. 1 item
    1. BM Visit

  27. 33 and 34. Gareth Williams: Coinage 13 items
    1. These sessions will provide an overview of Anglo-Saxon coinage, its iconography and usage.

    2. Reading:- 12 items
      1. Coins and the archaeologist - Casey, P. J., Reece, Richard 1988

        Book  Especially the papers by John Kent (Interpreting coin finds) and Marion Archibald (English medieval coins as dating evidence)

      2. Coinage and history in the North Sea world, c. AD 500-1200: essays in honour of Marion Archibald - Cook, Barrie, Williams, Gareth, Archibald, Marion 2006

        Book  Contains papers on a wide variety of Anglo-Saxon and Viking monetary topics. The articles by Richard Abdy and Gareth Williams are particularly important from a methodological perspective, as well as providing a major reinterpretation of coin use in the 5th-7th centuries. Alan Vince's paper is a useful integration of archaeological and numismatic evidence.

      3. Early Anglo-Saxon coins - Williams, Gareth 2008

        Book 

      4. Silver economy in the Viking age - Graham-Campbell, James, Williams, Gareth c2007

        Book  The papers in this volume provide a mixture of academic perspectives on coinage, bullion and status economies in the Viking age, drawing on archaeology, history, numismatics and economic anthropology. the papers by the two editors provide overviews and critique of the subject as a whole.

      5. The iconography of early Anglo-Saxon coinage: sixth to eighth centuries - Gannon, Anna 2003

        Book  The most significant at historical study of the Anglo-Saxon coinage to date with detailed comparisons between coins and designs in other media.

      6. Money talks: reconstructing Old English - Fran Colman 1992

        Book 

      7. An atlas of Anglo-Saxon and Norman coin finds, c.973-1086 - Metcalf, D. M., Royal Numismatic Society (Great Britain) 1998

        Book  Although some of the interpretations and conclusions are contentious (and rather more speculative than the author seems to acknowledge), this shows the sort of questions which can be asked of coinage as evidence.

      8. Kings, currency and alliances: history and coinage of southern England in the ninth century - Blackburn, M. A. S., Dumville, D. N. 1998

        Book  The papers by Simon Keynes and Mark Blackburn on Alfred provide an excellent case-study on the use of coins together with other forms of historical evidence, but several of the other papers are also of interest.

      9. Anglo-Saxon monetary history: essays in memory of Michael Dolley - Blackburn, M. A. S., Dolley, Michael 1986

        Book  Useful papers on a variety of topics.

      10. Dark age economics: the origins of towns and trade A.D. 600-1000 - Hodges, Richard 1982

        Book  Somewhat dated but not yet superseded as the main economic text book for the early Anglo-Saxon period.

      11. Social approaches to Viking studies - Samson, Ross 1991

        Book  Contains a number of interesting papers which cross the boundaries between archaeology, anthropology, economics and monetary history.

  28. 35a. Andrew Reynolds: Art Styles: Quoit Brooch Style, Nydam Style and Style I 3 items
    The ornamentation of metalwork found in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries and settlements combines geometric and plant motifs with depictions of animal and human forms derived from provincial Roman art. Quoit Brooch Style seems to represent an insular British version of the provincial roman material developed through the 5th century, while Nydam Style is a contemporary South Scandinavian development of Roman provincial art. From Nydam Style emerges Salin's Style I before the end of the fifth century in South Scandinavia and spreads to England as well as other regions of western Europe. This truly Germanic art style is defined by the use of contour lines to define individual parts of animals, permitting them to be used to fill spaces. The animals are virtually always quadrupeds or humans, but can be part human and part animal and in some cases a predatory bird may depicted.
    1. Reading:- 3 items
      1. Salin's Style I - G Haseloff 1974

        Article 

  29. 35b.Andrew Reynolds: Art styles: Style II and cloisonne ornament from Sutton Hoo to Cuthbert 2 items
    The origins of Salin's Style II lie in Scandinavia in the 6th century with gold filigree work being influential in the development of interlaced animal ornament. The range of animals is enlarged from Style I to included snakes and predatory birds iwht a distinctively different range of characteristics which differentiate these animals from those in Style I. Cast and repousse ornament occcur as well as filigree and zoomorphic motifs can also be expressed jewelled cellwork (cloisonne) characteristically setting garnet plates. The adoption of this ornament in the late 6th century in Kent and East Anglia leads to vigorous development as late as second half of the 7th century.
    1. Reading:- 2 items
      1. Merovingian garnet jewellery: emergence and social implications - Arrhenius, Birgit, Carlström, Diego 1985

        Book 

  30. 36a.Andrew Reynolds: Anglo-Saxon Art: the late 7th to 8th centuries 20 items
    This session will look a the evidence for developing styles and exteranl influences in what has often in the past been termed the 'Hiberno-Saxon' phase of art, when Irish and Scottish influences (particularly in illuminated manuscript art) brought about a fusion of Celtic, Germanic and classical forms, particularly in the Northumbria. Beginning with the Books of Durrow and Kells, but cncentrating for the most part on the Lindisfarme Gospels an other Northumbrian products, the production, purpost and lasting importance of these gospel books will be considered. The related Northumbrian artistic achievement in stone sculpture, such as the Bewcastle and Ruthwell crosses, will also be introduced.
    1. Reading:- 20 items
      1. The Lindisfarne Gospels - Backhouse, Janet 1981

        Book 

      2. General introduction and various county-based volumes.

      3. Corpus of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture: Vol. 5: Lincolnshire - Everson, Paul, Stocker, D. A., British Academy 1999

        Book 

      4. Corpus of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture: Vol.2: Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire North-of-the-Sands - Bailey, Richard N., Cramp, Rosemary, British Academy c1988

        Book 

      5. Corpus of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture: Vol. 4: South-East England - Tweddle, Dominic, Biddle, Martin, Kjølbye-Biddle, Birthe, British Academy c1995

        Book 

      6. Corpus of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture: Vol. 6: Northern Yorkshire - Lang, James T., Craig, Derek 2001

        Book 

      7. Northumbria's golden age - Hawkes, Jane, Mills, Susan 1999

        Book 

      8. Studies in insular art and archaeology - Karkov, Catherine E., Farrell, Robert T. 1991

        Book 

      9. The age of migrating ideas: early medieval art in Northern Britain and Ireland - Spearman, Michael, Higgitt, John, International Conference on Insular Art, National Museums of Scotland 1993

        Book 

      10. The Making of England: Anglo-Saxon art and culture AD600-900 - Webster, L., Backhouse, Janet, Archibald, Marion, British Museum 1991

        Book 

      11. The transformation of the Roman world AD 400-900 - Webster, Leslie, Brown, Michelle 1997

        Book 

  31. 36b.Andrew Reynolds: Anglo-Saxon art: the 9th to 11th centuries 13 items
    Moving on to looking at more diverse media, including metalwork and stone sculpture, this session will trace the role of art in everyday life in later Anglo-Saxon England. The archaeological significance of sculptural assemblages, hoards and metal-detected finds bearing characteristic motifs such as the 'Trewhiddle style' will be examined, alond with high status individual examples such as the Alfred Jewel. The session will also trace the influence of Viking art forms on Insular art in metalwork, wood, and sculpture. Northern England in particular has a significant number of stone sculptural monuments, including crosses, recumbent slabs and hogbacks. In southern England, the developed arts of the 10th to 11th centuries were an eclectic mix (e.g. the Winchester style) which prefigured the devlopment of Romanesque art.
    1. Reading:- 13 items
      1. The Golden age of Anglo-Saxon art, 966-1066 - Backhouse, Janet, Turner, D. H., Webster, L., British Museum 1984

        Book 

      2. Viking age sculpture in Northern England - Bailey, Richard N. 1980

        Book 

      3. General introduction and various county based volumes are located in Lecture 36a

      4. Grammar of Anglo-Saxon ornament: a general introduction to the Corpus of Anglo-Saxon sculpture - Cramp, Rosemary, British Academy 1991

        Book  General introduction and various county based volumes are located in Lecture 36a

      5. Image and power in the archaeology of early medieval Britain: essays in honour of Rosemary Cramp - Arthur MacGregor, Rosemary Cramp, Helena Hamerow c2001

        Book 

      6. The Making of England: Anglo-Saxon art and culture AD600-900 - Webster, L., Backhouse, Janet, Archibald, Marion, British Museum 1991

        Book 

      7. Viking art - Klindt-Jensen, Ole, Wilson, David M. 1980

        Book 

  32. 37a. Andrew Reynolds: The Harley Psalter and material culture 3 items
    The Harley Psalter is a complex piece of late Anglo Saxon manuscript art. A extensive series of pen and ink drawings by several different artists over a period of decades incorporates a series of artefacts, structures and situations that reflect in some cases earlier exemplars and in others the contemporary world of the artist. This session explores the methodologies for examining such a source.
    1. Sources:- 3 items
      1. Most of the folios have been digitised and appear on the British Library website: http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/results.asp otherwise there are many plates in Ohlgren, T., 1992. 'Anglo-Saxon textual illustration: photographs of sixteen manuscripts with descriptions and index' [IoA DAA 390 Qto OHL ].

      2. Reading:- 2 items
        1. The Harley Psalter - William Noel 2009

          Book 

  33. 37b. Andrew Reynolds: The Bayeux Tapestry and material culture 8 items
    The Bayeux Tapestry is a work of art, a piece of advanced technology in itself, a primary historical document for the Norman Conquest, and a source of much incidental detail about life in the mid-to late eleventh century. This session will concentrate not so much on the political story surrounding the Battle of Hastings, but on the implications of the Bayeux Tapestry for our understanding of contemporary culture, including society, literacy, military organisation, shipbuilding and architecture.
    1. Reading:- 8 items
      1. The Bayeux Tapestry: new interpretations - Foys, Martin K., Overbey, Karen Eileen, Terkla, Dan 2009

        Book 

      2. The study of the Bayeux tapestry - Gameson, Richard 1997

        Book 

      3. The archaeological authority of the Bayeux Tapestry - Lewis, Michael John 2005

        Book 

      4. The rhetoric of power in the Bayeux tapestry - Lewis, Suzanne 1999

        Book 

      5. The Bayeux tapestry: a comprehensive survey - Stenton, F. M., Bertrand, Simone 1965

        Book 

  34. 38. Course review and examination revision class (AR) 0 items
  35. ONLINE RESOURCES 0 items
    The full UCL Institute of Archaeology coursework guidelines are given here: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/administration/students/handbook The full text of this handbook is available here:Moodle access code: ARCL2018
  36. Essay 1 (a and b) -Reading:- 12 items
    1. Essential Reading: 7 items
      1. Britain and the end of the Roman Empire - K. R. Dark 2000

        Book 

      2. Picts, Gaels and Scots: early historic Scotland - Sally M. Foster 1996

        Book 

      3. South western Britain in the early Middle Ages - Susan M. Pearce 2004

        Book 

    2. Recommended Reading: 4 items
      1. Celtic Britain - Charles Thomas 1986

        Book 

    3. Additional Reading: 1 item
      1. Saints and sea-kings: the first kingdom of the Scots - Campbell, Ewan, Historic Scotland 1999

        Book 

  37. SITES 14 items
    1. Essential Reading: 8 items
      1. Cadbury Castle, Somerset: the early Medieval archaeology - Leslie Alcock, S. J. Stevenson, C. R. Musson 1995

        Book 

      2. Dunadd: an early Dalriadic capital - Alan Lane, Ewan Campbell c2000

        Book 

      3. Cadbury Congresbury 1968-73: a late/post-Roman hilltop settlement in Somerset - Philip A. Rahtz, Marion Barraclough 1992

        Book 

    2. Recommended Reading: 6 items
      1. Cadbury Castle, Somerset: the later prehistoric and early historical archaeology - John C. Barrett, Philip Freeman, Ann Woodward, Leslie Alcock 2000

        Book 

      2. Tintagel - C.D. Morris 1998

        Article 

      3. English heritage book of Tintagel: Arthur and archaeology - Charles Thomas, English Heritage 1993

        Book 

  38. TOPICAL DISCUSSIONS 11 items
    1. Essential Reading: 6 items
      1. Power and politics in early medieval Britain and Ireland - Stephen T. Driscoll, Margaret R. Nieke c1988

        Book 

      2. The age of migrating ideas: early medieval art in Northern Britain and Ireland - Michael Spearman, John Higgitt, International Conference on Insular Art, National Museums of Scotland 1993

        Book 

      3. The art of the Picts: sculpture and metalwork in early medieval Scotland - George Henderson, Isabel Henderson 2004

        Book 

    2. Recommended Reading: 5 items
      1. The Christian Celts: treasures of late Celtic Wales - M. Redknap, National Museum of Wales 1991

        Book 

  39. (b) 9 items
    1. Essential Reading: 3 items
      1. Towns and trade in the age of Charlemagne - Richard Hodges 2000

        Book 

      2. Mohammed, Charlemagne & the origins of Europe: archaeology and the Pirenne thesis - Richard Hodges, David Whitehouse 1983

        Book 

    2. Recommended Reading: 5 items
      1. The rebirth of towns in the West AD 700-1050: a review of current research into how, when, and why there was a rebirth of towns between 700 and 1050 - Richard Hodges, Brian Hobley, Joint CBA/DUA International Conference on the Rebirth of Towns in the West, AD 700-1050, Council for British Archaeology 1988

        Book  Chapters 1,11,13,14 and 17

      2. The Anglo Saxon Towns of Kent - T. Tatton-Brown

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

    3. Additional Reading: 1 item
      1. The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England - David M. Wilson 1981, c1976

        Book 

  40. KEY SITES 2 items
    Ipswich (Gippeswic) Very little available in print, but see:
    1. Essential Reading: 1 item
    2. Recommended Reading: 1 item
      1. Radiocarbon dating and Anglo Saxon graves - C Scull, A Bayliss

        Chapter 

  41. London (Lundenwic) 6 items
    1. Essential Reading: 1 item
      1. Middle Saxon London: excavations at the Royal Opera House 1989-99 - Gordon Malcolm, David Bowsher, Robert Cowie c2003

        Book 

    2. Recommended Reading: 4 items
      1. Tatberht's Lundenwic: archaeological excavations in middle Saxon London - Jim Leary, Gary Brown, Pre-Construct Archaeology Limited (Firm) 2004

        Book 

    3. Additional Reading: 1 item
  42. Southampton (Hamwic) 7 items
    1. Essential Reading: 3 items
      1. Excavations at Hamwic: Vol.2: Excavations at Six Dials - Peter Andrews, J. Bayley, Council for British Archaeology 1997

        Book 

      2. Excavations at Hamwic: Vol.1: Excavations 1946-83, excluding Six Dials and Melbourne Street - A. D. Morton, S. Davies, Council for British Archaeology 1992

        Book 

      3. The Hamwih pottery: the local and imported wares from 30 years' excavations at Middle Saxon Southampton and their European context - Richard Hodges, John F. Cherry, Council for British Archaeology, Southampton Archaeological Research Committee 1981

        Book 

    2. Recommended Reading: 1 item
      1. Southampton finds: Vol.1: The coins and pottery from Hamwic - Peter Andrews, Mark Brisbane 1988

        Book 

    3. Additional Reading: 3 items
      1. The Hamwic glass - John Hunter, M. P. Heyworth, Wendy Fletcher, Council for British Archaeology 1998

        Book 

      2. Excavations at Melbourne Street, Southampton, 1971-76 - Philip Holdsworth, David Alban Hinton, Southampton Archaeological Research Committee, Council for British Archaeology 1980

        Book 

  43. York (Eoforwic) 2 items
    1. Essential Reading: 2 items
      1. The archaeology of York: Vol. 7: Anglian York - P. V. Addyman, Richard L. Kemp, York Archaeological Trust, Council for British Archaeology 1996

        Book 

      2. Anglian York: a survey of the evidence - Dominic Tweddle, Joan Moulden, Elizabeth Logan, York Archaeological Trust 1999

        Book 

  44. Topical Discussions 6 items
    1. Essential Reading: 3 items
      1. The long eighth century - Chris Wickham, Inge Lyse Hansen 2000

        Book  Good case studies for the wider European context

      2. Wics: the early medieval trading centres of northern Europe - David Hill, Robert Cowie c2001

        Book  Especially the papers by Blackmore on pottery and Scull on burial

      3. Markets in early medieval Europe: trading and 'productive' sites, 650-850 - Tim Pestell, Katharina Ulmschneider c2003

        Book  Good case studies for the wider European context

    2. Recommended Reading: 3 items
      1. Anglo-Saxon trading centres: beyond the emporia - Mike Anderton, Conference on the emporia written about in Richard Hodge's "Dark Age Economics" 1999

        Book 

      2. The decline of the wic? - R. A. Hall

        Chapter  Digitised Reading

  45. Essay 2 (a) and (b) 12 items
    1. Essential Reading: 6 items
      1. English Heritage book of Anglo-Saxon England - Martin G. Welch, English Heritage 1992

        Book 

      2. Burial in early medieval England and Wales - Sam Lucy, Andrew Reynolds, Society for Medieval Archaeology 2002

        Book 

      3. Burial archaeology: current research methods and developments - Frances Lee, Charlotte A. Roberts, J. L. Bintliff 1989

        Book 

    2. Recommended Reading: 6 items
      1. Origins of the English - Catherine Hills c2003

        Book 

      2. Early Historic Britain - C Hills

        Chapter 

      3. Anglo-Saxon cemeteries 1979 - Philip A. Rahtz, Tania M. Dickenson, Lorna Watts, Anglo-Saxon Symposium at Oxford 1980

        Book 

      4. Anglo-Saxon cemeteries: a reappraisal : proceedings of a conference held at Liverpool Museum, 1986 - Edmund Southworth, Liverpool Museum (Liverpool, England) 1991

        Book 

      5. Death, decay and reconstruction: approaches to archaeology and forensic science - A. Boddington, A. N. Garland, R. C. Janaway c1987

        Book 

      6. Burial practice in early England - Alison Taylor 2001

        Book 

  46. SITES 11 items
    1. Essential Reading: 3 items
      1. Anglo-Saxon Cemetery - J Timby, I Sancton 1993

        Article 

      2. Wasperton: a Roman, British and Anglo-Saxon community in central England - M. O. H. Carver, Catherine Hills, Jonathan Scheschkewitz 2009

        Book 

    2. Recommended Reading: 8 items
      1. The Anglo-Saxon cemetery on Mill Hill, Deal, Kent - Keith Parfitt, Birte Brugmann, Society for Medieval Archaeology 1997

        Book 

      2. East Anglian archaeology: Report no. 6: Norfolk: The Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Spong Hill volume 1 - Catherine Hills, Peter Wade-Martins, Norfolk Archaeological Unit (Norfolk, England), Scole Committee for Archaeology in East Anglia 1977

        Book 

      3. The Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Spong Hill, North Elmham: Part III: Catalogue of inhumations - Catherine Hills, Kenneth Penn, Robert Rickett, H. M. Appleyard 1984

        Book 

      4. The Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Spong Hill, North Elmham: Part 5: Catalogue of cremations - Catherine Hill, Kenneth Penn, Robert Rickett 1993

        Book 

      5. The Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Spong Hill, North Elmham: Part 8: The cremations - Jacqueline I. McKinley, Julie Bond, Robert Rickett 1994

        Book 

  47. (b) Start with: 2 items
    1. Essential Reading: 2 items
      1. The church in Anglo-Saxon society - John Blair 2005

        Book  Esp. pp. 204-12

  48. Then read: 1 item
    1. Recommended Reading: 1 item
  49. Followed by : 4 items
    1. Recommended Reading: 4 items
  50. Then read a good selection of the following: 14 items
    1. Recommended Reading: 12 items
      1. Anglo-Saxon Oxfordshire - John Blair 1994

        Book  pp. 114 -116 for Eynsham Abbey

      2. The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England - David M. Wilson 1981, c1976

        Book 

      3. Wearmouth and Jarrow monastic sites - Rosemary Cramp, G. Bettess 2005-2006

        Book 

      4. English Heritage book of Glastonbury - Philip A. Rahtz, English Heritage 1993

        Book 

    2. For further details about dating, see the references to site reports in Cramp 1976.

    3. For a comparative continental plan see: 1 item