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  1. (1) 10 January - Atypical Development Trajectories (Dagmara Dimitriou) 0 items
    No set texts for this week. The session will start with a brief introduction to the module and some basic principles of a developmental perspective/s. We will also discuss DSM-5, its history, theory and applications for educational and clinical settings.
  2. (2) 17 January - Sleep Disorders (Dagmara Dimitriou) 4 items
    Sleep is important to health and contributes to optimal neuropsychological function and learning. For example, sleep deprivation can cause reduced optimal daytime functioning and academic performance of a child. An increasing number of studies on typically developing population suggest a functional significance of the “sleeping brain” for the processing of newly acquired information. This lecture will also consider influence of sleep on children with developmental disorders.
    1. Seminar activity 1 item
      Please read the following chapter
    2. Psychology - G. Neil Martin, Neil R. Carlson, William Buskist 2010

      Book 

    3. Sleep enhances memory consolidation in children - Anna Ashworth, Catherine M. Hill, Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Dagmara Dimitriou 06/2014

      Article 

    4. To sleep, perchance to enrich learning? - C. M Hill, A. M Hogan, A. Karmiloff-Smith 01/07/2007

      Article 

  3. (3) 24 January - Eating Disorders (Amy Harrison) 5 items
    Eating disorders commonly have their onset in adolescence and effects of starvation of the brain and body can have a significant impact on development (Schmidt et al., 2016). In this interactive lecture, we will critically evaluate the diagnostic criteria for eating disorders, explore how eating disorders commonly present alongside other mental health difficulties, discuss the biopsychosocial aetiology of eating disorders and explore what helps with regards to prevention and treatment.
    1. Eating Disorders - Christopher G. Fairburn, Simon G. Gowers

      Chapter 

    2. Eating disorders: the big issue - Ulrike Schmidt, Roger Adan, Ilka Böhm, Iain C Campbell 04/2016

      Article 

  4. (4) 31 January - Mood Disorders (Jennifer Allen) 6 items
    This session covers mood disorders, including depression and bipolar disorder. DSM-V criteria for these disorders in the will be reviewed, along with current controversies in understanding and classifying these disorders. Gender differences in the presentation and prevalence of these disorders will be discussed. Social and cognitive processes implicated in the aetiology of mood disorders will be explored.
    1. Adolescent Depression - Constance Hammen 08/2009

      Article 

    2. A review of cognitive biases in youth depression: attention, interpretation and memory - Belinda Platt, Allison M. Waters, Gerd Schulte-Koerne, Lina Engelmann 03/04/2017

      Article 

  5. (5) 7 February - Disruptive Behaviour Disorders (Jennifer Allen) 5 items
    This session covers disruptive behaviour disorders (Oppositional Defiant and Conduct Disorder) and callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Criteria for these disorders in the DSM-V will be reviewed, along with current controversies in understanding and classifying these psychological disorders. Gender and developmental differences in the presentation and prevalence of these disorders will be covered. Different social and cognitive processes implicated in the aetiology of DBDs and CU traits will be explored.
    1. Developmental pathways to disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders - Michelle M. Martel 2018

      Book  Read Chapter One "Disruptive, impulse-control and conduct disorders" by Frick & Matlasz and Chapter Two "Oppositional defiant disorder" by Burke & Romano-Verthelyi

    2. Disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders - Paul J. Frick, Tatiana M. Matlasz

      Chapter 

  6. (6) 14 February - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Leo Bevilacqua) 4 items
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a complex and heterogeneous behavioural condition, characterised mainly by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness. DSM 5 distinguishes between three subtypes: predominantly hyperactive/impulsive, predominantly inattentive, and combined presentation. Behavioural impairment can be classified as mild, moderate or severe. ADHD is often associated with Conduct Disorder, and presents with a number of concomitant risk factors such as poverty, family disruption and physical health problems. ADHD is predictive of higher risk of poor outcomes in later life (i.e. school failure, antisocial behaviour, drug use and other mental health difficulties).
  7. (7) 21 February - Psychosis (Keri Wong) 5 items
  8. (8) 28 February - Autism Spectrum Disorder and Family Mental Health (Dagmara Dimitriou and Georgia Pavlopoulou) 3 items
    Autism is currently defined in terms of a core set of behaviours, including difficulties in social communication and restricted and repetitive behaviours, and activities. The past three decades have witnessed considerable efforts being directed towards understanding the neurodevelopmental atypicalities and/or impairments that underlie these behaviours. In this lecture, I will provide an overview of what we know about cognitive and behavioural functioning in individuals with ASD. This session will also consider strengths and weaknesses of individuals as they grow. This session will also consider adulthood and educational aspects.
  9. (9) 7 March - Down Syndrome and William Syndrome (Dagmara Dimitriou) 2 items
    In this lecture we will consider two common developmental disorders, namely Down Syndrome (DS) and Williams Syndrome (WS). Down Syndrome is one of the most leading causes of intellectual disability. People with DS face various health issues including learning and memory, congenital heart and so on. A central part of this session is to present you with developmental pathways in children with intellectual disabilities such as Down's syndrome.
  10. (10) 14 March - Anxiety Disorders (Jennifer Allen) 5 items
    Anxiety disorders are common in childhood and adolescence and associated with significant impairment in family, school and social settings. They tend to have an early age of onset, take a chronic and recurrent course if left untreated, and increase the risk for mental health problems including other anxiety disorders, depression and substance abuse. This session will cover the presentation, diagnosis, prevalence, stability, comorbidity and outcomes of childhood anxiety disorders; in addition to assessment, aetiology, and treatment. Developmental issues will also be considered in relation to these aforementioned areas.
    1. Anxiety Disorders During Childhood and Adolescence: Origins and Treatment - Ronald M. Rapee, Carolyn A. Schniering, Jennifer L. Hudson 04/2009

      Article 

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